Julius
Green, Jr.

I am the first African American Diving Officer in the U.S. Army and the second African American Master Diver in the U.S. Military. This book tells my life’s story and is dedicated to my deceased parents…

About Author

I am a School License Marine Engineering Warrant Officer who served as a Chief Engineer onboard an Army Vessel at Fort Eustis, Virginia, and two tours in Vietnam.
I retired from the Army as a Deepsea Master Diver, having served at Fort Eustis, Virginia, Inchon Korea, Goose Bay, Labrador, and Sander-Strom, Greenland. “Reflection on Years Gone By” is being published because I want future generations to see the struggles I encountered during my life journey.
This book will provide a brief history of how I have perceived the world in eighty-nine years of life. It is a look into my family history that hopefully will be cherished for many years in the future. If any portion of the book brings some joy or revelation to you, I will be thankful.

Personal life

I am a School License Marine Engineering Warrant Officer who served as a Chief Engineer onboard an Army Vessel at Fort Eustis, Virginia, and two tours in Vietnam.

Acknowledgment

I would like to take this opportunity to say thanks to the following persons who were very helpful and patient with me as I put together the events, places, dates, times, and things. I will not forget the lessons that my father taught me about farming, including plowing and other tasks.

Dedication

This book is dedicated to my deceased parents, who provided for the family during the hard times on the farm in the 1930s and 1940s.

About Book

This book is about a young Black man who grew up in the South in the township of Allendale, South Carolina. I attended school at Allendale County Colored Training School before segregation. On December 30, 1950, I voluntarily enlisted in the United States Army. This is a compelling story about my trials and tribulation, the same probably experienced by many who grew up during segregation and were forced to excel and perform twice as better than white peers to break through social barriers and to satisfy family and parental expectations along with the inner self. As I am getting old, you know, many of my friends continue to ask me, why can’t you sit down and write your life story to include your unique military experience, so the future generations will be able to see some of the hardships you encountered before and during segregation.

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